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26th March 2021
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Why not plant a butterfly garden this Easter

Gardening is a pastime which helps keep us fit and healthy in both mind and body. Wildlife gardening also lets us enjoy and connect to nature.

You may remember that in a recent edition of ‘Stay in Touch’, we shared news of our partnership with Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust, in our ongoing commitment to supporting stronger environmental protection, wellbeing and the improvement of public spaces for the benefit of local communities.

Here at Ascot Lloyd, our focus is on the financial wellbeing of our clients, however now more than ever, many are investing more time in looking after all aspects of their wellbeing.

Our friends at the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust have been busy promoting ways you can do just that by getting closer to nature. Ideas such as wildlife gardening and how to build a butterfly garden provide perfect activities to enjoy outdoors this spring, perhaps with children over the Easter break. These initiatives not only benefit local wildlife and the environment, but they can boost your wellbeing too.

Gardening with wildlife in mind is an excellent way of building a close and meaningful connection with the living world. It can connect you more closely with the seasons, provide a great sense of satisfaction and enjoyment to see that your actions, such as choosing butterfly-friendly plants, or adding a bird bath, can really benefit nature.

Taking time to observe wildlife in our gardens helps distract us from daily stresses and lets our minds rest from cognitive tiring activities. Spending just a little time each day in our gardens, especially when paying attention to the wildlife we share them with, is an incredibly effective way to recharge our mental and emotional batteries.

5 Ways to rebalance your wellbeing this Easter:

  1. Learn: Try something new outside – find out how to identify that bird song or have a go at making a butterfly garden. Our friends at the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust have some great ideas for you to try
  2. Be active: Do some gardening or go outside for a walk in your nearest park or nature reserve
  3. Connect: With the people around you, share your wildlife experiences
  4. Give: Do something to help your local area and wildlife that live there
  5. Notice: Find a quiet spot in your garden and watch what nature visits you

With longer evenings on the horizon and with any luck, a little more sunshine too, we hope that you’ll be able to take advantage of spending more time in your garden or local green spaces over Easter and the coming weeks, enjoying the simple pleasures that nature provides us with.

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IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Investment involves risk.

This communication is issued by Capital Professional Limited, trading as Ascot Lloyd. Registered office: Ground Floor Reading Bridge House, George Street, Reading, England, RG1 8LS. Capital Professional Limited is registered in England and Wales (number 07584487) and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN: 578614).

This communication is for information purposes only. Nothing in this communication constitutes financial, professional or investment advice or a personal recommendation. This communication should not be construed as a solicitation or an offer to buy or sell any securities or related financial instruments in any jurisdiction. No representation or warranty, either expressed or implied, is provided in relation to the accuracy, completeness or reliability of the information contained herein, nor is it intended to be a complete statement or summary of the securities, markets or developments referred to in the document. Any opinions expressed in this document are subject to change without notice and may differ or be contrary to opinions expressed by other business areas or companies within the same group as Ascot Lloyd as a result of using different assumptions and criteria.